2017 Winter Conference – Technology: Balancing Profit, Lifestyle & Patient Care

By Dr. Doug Depew

The 2017 AAO Winter Conference is quickly approaching. Our theme of this year’s meeting Technology: Balancing Profit, Lifestyle and Patient Care.  It promises to be a meeting filled with information for both newer and established practices to help make those tough decisions on what technology is important to use in our practices and when we may wish to invest in it.

The meeting will begin with keynote speaker Jack Shaw.   Mr. Shaw is a world- renowned technology futurist who will be discussing how cutting edge and disrupting technologies will change the way we do business and run our practices in the coming years.

IT guru Steve McEvoy will be answering some of those pesky questions we all have about computer hardware, effective and cost-efficient data backup, and security.   In the ever changing world of computers, what you hear at this meeting will certainly be different than what Mr. McEvoy would have talked about even a couple of years ago.

On Friday afternoon we’ll have a lively discussion by Drs. Greg Jorgensen and Neil Kravitz regarding building our practices through social media, websites, and Internet marketing. Their success in these areas has been paramount in growing their thriving practices.

Saturday morning will begin with Dr. Aaron Molen sharing his experience and thoughts on bringing emerging technology into our practices to help create more efficient and more comfortable patient care.

We’re excited to have Drs. Ed Lin and Christian Groth discussing how to integrate some of the latest technology hardware into our orthodontic practices. This includes workflows for using CBCT, Scanners and 3D Printing.

The conference will conclude with Chris Bentson and Charles Loretto with a discussion on how technology can affect the value and profitability in our practices. This should help answer the question about at what stage of practice a doctor might consider investing in advanced technology.

The location for the meeting is at the gorgeous Marriott Harbor Beach Resort and Spa in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The dates are February 10-11, 2017. The schedule is organized in a way to allow some time for afternoon recreation.

There will be plenty of time allotted for attendees to ask questions of the speakers to be sure all bases are covered.   To learn more and to register, visit https://www.aaoinfo.org/meetings/2017-winter-conference-technology-balancing-profit-lifestyle-patient-care

Nanotechnology: From Small Scale to Great Innovations

By Dr. Celestino Nobrega

dr Celestino Nobrega 2007Are you prepared for the amazing benefits and innovations that Nanotechnology will shortly bring to orthodontics? Richard Feynman (http://www.feynman.com), an American theoretical visionary physicist, introduced Nanotechnology as a science that embraces the capability to see and to arrange atoms and molecules according to a particular convenience or goal.

Nanotechnology involves the development and utilization of structures, devices, and systems that have properties and new functions due to their small size. A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter. For reference, consider that there are about 25,400,000 nanometers in an inch, and a single sheet of paper is about 100,000 nanometers thick.

The NNI (National Nanotechnology Initiative) is a U.S. Government research and development initiative that is focused on delivering the shared vision of “a future in which the ability to understand and control matter at the nanoscale leads to a revolution in technology and industry that benefits society.” NNI is chartered to develop a framework for sharing strategies in order to support nanoscale projects. Common goals, strategies and priorities are now being drawn for distinct science fields, such as biology, engineering, chemistry and, of course, materials science. With this support, nanotechnology R&D is taking place in academic, government, and industry laboratories across the United States.

As Orthodontics progresses into a refined science and with the support of technology advancements, unimaginable results can be achieved in the near future, especially when our specialty can leverage nanotechnology innovations such as selective biosensors. The oral cavity can be considered as an important source of information that could be extremely helpful not only for orthodontic treatment, but also for early stage diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases. It’s largely known that the exhaled human breath contains several Volatile Organic Compounds biomarkers (VOCs). Accurate detection of these VOCs can provide essential information for the diagnosis of those diseases. For example, Acetone (CH3COCH3), H2S, NH3, NO, and Toluene can potentially be used to evaluate diabetes, halitosis, kidney malfunction, asthma, and lung cancer, respectively.

Breath analysis, pH level and temperature data can be captured and processed by multiple sensors and could potentially reduce the medical diagnostic costs for patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In addition, patients’ quality of life could be improved. For example, diabetic individuals could possibly benefit from using non-invasive nanostructured hemitubes Silicon-doped (WO3) films to sense acetone exhaled breath levels, which can eliminate painful and invasive fingertip pricking.

As I observe the emergence of recent technology advancements within orthodontics, I can envision a future of innovative orthodontic portable devices that can accurately capture, track and transmit these previously mentioned biological signals.

In this category, we can include the exciting new innovation of dental movement acceleration devices (periodontal tissue activation by vibration). Along with achieving their primary objective of delivering pulsatile forces to accelerate tooth movement and to reduce treatment time, these devices could also be used to capture intra-oral data through the action of nanosensors and wirelessly transmit this information to personal mobile devices and laptops. The remotely collected data can be stored on the cloud to create an intelligent system for support of clinical decisions. This robust wireless communication and database creation has the potential to support multiple users throughout the orthodontic treatment process:

  • Orthodontist: electronic health records (EHR) enrichment; treatment plan refinement according to patient features; suggestions for treatment plan improvement according to case’s evolution; warning signals and alerts to monitor patient’s general and intra oral health.
  • Patient: real time communication with the Orthodontist or their staff through smartphone connection; treatment status check; sharing treatment experiences with other potential patients; automatically get FAQ answers.
  • Companies, industries and laboratories: helpful database for new products designs, services and needs.
  • Scientific research: Database for systematic reviews, Meta-Analysis.

So, are you prepared for “small” technology and big changes?