Big Data Revisited

By Anthony M. Puntillo DDS, MSD

In August 2014, I wrote an introductory article for this blog entitled “What is Big Data and How is it Related to the Practice of Orthodontics?” As more orthodontic practices move to the digital collection of orthodontic treatment records (EHRs-photos, models, radiographs, treatment history) and more of our data is being stored in the “cloud”, there is a tremendous opportunity for us as a profession to access that data for the betterment of our patients and advancement of our specialty. Over the last ~3.5 years, however, there has been little visible traction by our researchers and leadership on this front. Meanwhile, there should be no doubt that corporate entities (DSOs and orthodontic vendors) understand the value of our data. Check out the recent cover article for Fortune Magazine (“Tech’s Next Big Wave: Big Data Meets Biology” -3/19/2018). The article notes that “The quest to retrieve, analyze, and leverage (medical) data has become the new gold rush.” If orthodontists are to hope to have any influence on how orthodontic treatment is delivered in the future, management of our patients’ data will be crucial. Technology has sped up every aspect of our lives. We must now start to give this issue the attention it desperately demands. But where should we begin?

If we are to tackle this challenge, there are many complex questions that will need to be answered. Our patients’ privacy is not the least of these. Even with our busy professional and personal lives, I imagine it has been hard for most to miss the recent public flogging of Mark Zuckerburg and Facebook. Both he and his company were taken to task by Congress and the media when they revealed that the personal data for 87 million of their customers had been inappropriately accessed by an outside research company. As a result of these disclosures, politicians are threatening regulations for their industry – think HIPAA for Silicon Valley. There are more than 2.5 million people who annually seek orthodontic treatment. As we look to find the best ways to utilize our patient’s treatment data to improve their care, we must make certain that it is being done in a way that is respectful of all patients’ privacy. While privacy may be where we start, there are other, even more difficult issues that need to be addressed.

The complexity of the Big Data issue will require the input from the brightest minds both from within and from outside of our profession. To that end, the Great Lakes Association of Orthodontists has put forth a resolution to this year’s American Association of Orthodontists House of Delegates. Resolution 18-18 GLAO (http://hod.live.aaoinfo.org/resolution2/18-18-glao-big-data-task-force-and-records-repository/) requests that our Association President appoint a Big Data task force. I would encourage you to review the resolution and let your representatives (HOD Delegates) know your feelings. While this issue is certain to require a significant investment of time, talent and financial resources, we cannot afford to leave this investment to outside sources. Those who control the data will control the future.

Is your Password Already Floating Around on the Internet?

By Steve McEvoy, Technology Consultant

Passwords are a pain. You need them when you turn your computer on, open your practice management software, access your email and when you access most any other Internet service like Gmail, Pandora, Dropbox, Facebook, etc. Keeping track of all of them is a hassle, and it is human nature to look for shortcuts – many people often use the same password for multiple sites.

Hackers are constantly looking for ways to steal information. Information is the new ‘gold’ on the Internet. The mention of ‘hacker’ conjures up images of a mysterious character lurking in a dark room, presumably hard at work trying to guess your username and password to gain access to your information. While this may still be the case in some situations, the hackers are smart folks, and they have moved on to where the real gold is. Rather than hacking us one person at a time, they are going after the websites where all of our collective online information lies.

Do you have an online account with any of these sites? LinkedIn, Yahoo, Dropbox, Adobe, Target, Home Depot, Comcast, Bell, Equifax or Experian? What all these sites (and many others I haven’t listed) have in common is that they were hacked, and some of the valuable information stolen included your username and passwords for their site. Ten’s of millions of usernames and passwords have been stolen. The hackers have realized that putting their efforts into breaking into a website yields much more information about you than trying to hack you directly.

How do you know if your username and password was breached?

Can you rely on the hacked website to notify you? Some sites, when they discover they have been hacked, implement a mandatory password change the next time you attempt to access the site. Has this ever happened to you? You log in to a website, and it immediately prompts you to verify your identity and change your password? It did for me a while back when I was using Dropbox. What they didn’t point out was that they had been breached, and for some period of time hackers could have accessed my data.

Can you even rely on the websites to know when they have been hacked? How would they know? It’s not like a traditional crime where you might see the broken window. Companies that aren’t making security a principal focus may be completely unaware of the breach and your user information for that site might be already out in the wild.

Troy Hunt is a security expert at Microsoft, he’s one of the white hat hackers on our side. He had the great idea to compile a list of all the available hacked accounts he could find. He scoured the ‘dark web’ to get copies of the information being sold by successful hacks (there is a thriving retail market for this fueled by BitCoin). He found nearly 5 billion accounts (that’s a B, not an M) from 265 known breaches. Then he created the website “Have I been Pwned” (www.haveibeenpwned.com). That’s not a typo, “pwned” is a slang online gaming term that roughly means “I own you” or “I conquered you” just like a hacker may have. His website is free to all. You can go to the site, enter the username that you may often use online (for example most people use their email address) and it will tell you if it knows your username was leaked in one of the breaches it knows about. I tried it with mine and found my information was leaked in the Adobe and Dropbox breaches.

You can also enter a password to see if the password is already in the known hacked password list. In the example shown here, I am testing the password that Invisalign Intraoral scanners use by default. Pwned.

A word of caution. Should we really trust that whoever is behind the website isn’t recording all the passwords tried? What if they get hacked? My advice is to be careful here and NOT test any of your CURRENT passwords you use where you have precious information kept (like your online bank account password). I know this is counter-intuitive, this is the first password you want to test to see if it’s safe.

Remember the bad habit that people have using the same username and password at multiple sites? If that’s you, and the hackers have got your username along with the password when they hacked one of these sites, I can guarantee you that these are the first things they are trying at other websites to see if they can get in (perhaps your bank). If the usernames and passwords are the same, they get immediate access without even needing to take a second guess. It happens all the time.

Consider all this carefully. Check the email you use typically for a user account at HaveIBeenPwnd.com. Perhaps check a password you use all the time. If you discover you have been pwn’d, change your passwords at all the sites that share that username immediately.

Business Card Scanners

By Matthew Larson, DDS, MS

Whether I’m at my office, at the AAO Annual Session, or networking around town, it seems like I always end up acquiring more business cards. However, having physical business cards doesn’t integrate well with how I try to digitally organize my life, so a couple years ago I started using a simple business card scanning app so that contact information was easily accessible when I needed it in the future.

There are many free or inexpensive business card scanning apps available for Android or iOS – the features and pricing change over time, so search in the App Store for current reviews and pricing. The particular app I have used for the last couple years is called CamCard and it’s made by the same company that produces the CamScanner app that Steve McEvoy talked about in a past post.  A friend had recommended this particular app and it was an inexpensive option ($0.99 for the full version) with good reviews. I have had a good experience with this app, although there are other good options available as well.

These business card scanning apps use your phone camera as a scanner as shown in the photo below, then they utilize optical character recognition (OCR) software to recognize the text. The ideal outcome is that the characters are all processed correctly and the software properly recognizes the fields (phone number, email, address, etc). In reality, the system isn’t perfect but it is significantly faster than trying to type all the text yourself. As you can see in the scan of my business card below, the app made the following errors:

  • It only recognized the first listed name on the card – even my phone knows to put my wife first!
  • My office name and logo is on the back of the card, so it was not automatically added.
  • The software missed the “4” at the beginning of my office address since it is overlapped with a darker area of my logo.

These are simple to fix, but frequently I don’t worry about minor mistakes if I’m in a hurry because the full image of the card is saved also. If you need to correct it later, you can always reference the photo of the card. I do make sure the name and the company is saved correctly so I can use the search functions in the app. Some other apps will have an actual human double check the character recognition and fields that are filled, but these apps tend to be more expensive and the information frequently isn’t added to your database for a couple days.

Once these cards are scanned in, there are additional features of the app that are nice for organization:

  • The app links to your contacts, so you don’t have to directly load the app to call, text, or email contacts that you have scanned.
  • You can create custom groups in the app to file contacts under, such as “referring dentists” or “AAO contacts”
  • Your business card and contact information can be emailed, texted, or directly exchanged with other users nearby.
  • You can add custom notes or photos to the contact to remind you where you met them and why you wanted to save their contact information.

Overall, this is not the most frequently utilized app on my phone, but it has dramatically helped me to quickly organize an area of my life and practice that I wasn’t organizing well before.

Facebook as an Education/Networking Tool

By Katie Graber, DDS, MS

Traditionally orthodontic professionals have relied upon refereed journals, scientific lectures or national/regional orthodontic meetings to garner information about the latest and best in treatment. In the last decade, many orthodontists have transitioned to attending distance-based seminars, listening to podcast recordings or following online group discussions in their area of interest. This, coupled with an increased attendance at specific vendor meetings, has changed the way information is communicated in our field to a portion of the membership.

One of the newer “remote” vehicles for information transfer is via private or closed Facebook groups. These groups can have a narrow or large focus. Some are grouped regionally, by alma mater, treatment style, etc. They can range in focus from practice design to technology to specific treatment products and/or mechanics.

Some forums that I follow include:

  • Elevate Orthodontics Podcast (1700+ members)
  • Ortho Cosmos Forum (1200+ members)
  • Jeff Nolte: Suresmile (300+members)
  • Women in Orthodontics (1200+ members)
  • AlignerInsider: Clinical Chat (1300+members)

Others include:

  • OrthoPreneurs (1600+ members)
  • The Pragmatic Orthodontist: Clinical (3000+ members)
  • The Pragmatic Orthodontist: Elite (150+ members)
  • Orthodontic Pearls (1800+ members)
  • OrthoX Elite
  • Ortho Aligner 3D Study Group
  • Ortho Voice
  • Sarver Orthodontic Study Group
  • Suresmile Synergy
  • Trios Orthodontic Study Group

These groups provide orthodontic professionals the opportunity to network online through a free source. Facebook closed groups permit the owner to determine the eligibility of the membership as well. Vetting members can take time and many of the host/owners do this on a voluntary basis. Additionally, the forum allows for easy photos, video and recording attachment and is an “in real time” communication tool for peer-peer discussions.

These orthodontic peer groups can get information to the user immediately. There is no waiting for a national or vendor meeting. While mostly anecdotal in nature, the “real life” experience of peers is a valuable source for cutting-edge advances. Sometimes the groups also use collective bargaining and/or group purchasing to earn discounts on products or services relevant to that group. Some I have seen include Mari’s list, 3D printers (Form2) and do-it-yourself aligner software. The discounts are above and beyond what a single orthodontic practice can earn or negotiate as the power comes from the sheer number of people interested/included in the discount group. This is another potential benefit to joining one of these online groups.

The Orthodontic Podcast group allows members to listen to orthodontists discuss current and relevant topics. This is reminiscent of the AAO Practical Reviews audio-cassette recordings of years past; albeit these have no continuing education credit associated nor are endorsed/reviewed/refereed by the AAO. A benefit of this type podcast (versus waiting for the practical reviews publication) is instant listening, the instant ability to download and listen across a broad spectrum of listening devices/locations. In addition, there is generally no fee (per se) to join the Facebook group nor listen in on many of the podcast recordings.

So, if you love “talking teeth” and have a specific interest; there is probably a Facebook group for you! Search your subject area under “groups” on Facebook and ask to join.

 

Time to Upgrade from Microsoft Office 2007

By Steve McEvoy, Technology Consultant

Almost every orthodontic practice has some version of Microsoft Office installed on one or more computers, and it’s very likely you do too.

Just like the Windows Operating System, Microsoft only provides patches and support for products for a limited amount of time.   Remember the Windows XP end of life hub-bub from a few years ago?   Well, this is the same thing with a different product.

If you use any version of Microsoft Office 2007, the extended support cycle ended on October 10th, 2017 (read the official notice here).   This means Microsoft will no longer release security updates or patches for it.   This means if some huge security vulnerability is found that might allow a hacker some form of control, they won’t be patching the hole and the only option will be to replace the software.

This is planned obsolescence.   Microsoft desperately wants to convince you to retire your really old versions and upgrade to the newest.  Of course, this comes at a cost.   Will your old version stop working?  No, it will run fine just has it always has, the only thing that stops is any form of patch or update.

You likely will see notices from practice management companies that rely on Microsoft Office as part of their requirements that they will no longer support systems that still have Office 2007 installed.   Why?  Because it’s a liability for them, and even they want you to upgrade to the latest version of Microsoft Office.

What does this mean practically?  Well, in my opinion, this is a 10+-year-old piece of software.   It’s now out of support.   It won’t work on Windows 10.   My advice would be to keep it in place on your old PCs until you replace the entire PC (because that PC is probably really old too) and buy a new version of Office at that time.  If your practice management company makes a fuss about replacing it, I would acquiesce and purchase the new version rather than fighting it.

What would an upgrade cost?   There is no ‘upgrade’ price for Microsoft Office.  You are stuck buying either their retail version, or a version that may be available with your new PC, or perhaps even their cloud version called Office 365 that allows you to install a local version on your computer.   Generally, they all work out to be about the same price – roughly $200 per PC.

CBCT Imaging for your Practice: Is Now the Time?

By Dr. Kenneth R  Webb

As I walked the exhibit floor at the AAO Annual Session in San Diego this past April, I stopped and talked to several of the company reps displaying the latest generation of CBCT scanners. Competition is good – what struck me is how far this technology has come in such a short period of time. Effective dose, image quality, and versatility are three areas where the advances are most impressive. I have witnessed these advancements first hand in my practice where we have been using CBCT since 2012 and recently upgraded a satellite office from a 2D digital Pan / Ceph to an “Ultra Low Dose” current generation CBCT scanner. I’d like to share some of my thoughts about the 2D to 3D transition.

Effective Dose
I encourage anyone interested in CBCT technology to search for studies authored by Dr. John Ludlow and his team. Dosimetry data and image quality for many CBCT scanners (both older and current generations) have been researched in great detail. Comparative data for 2D dental radiographic imaging (both intra and extra oral) is also available. By replacing our 2D Digital Pan / Ceph with a current generation CBCT scanner we have reduced the effective dose of our diagnostic records imaging by approximately 60%. (Ludlow JB, Walker C. AJO-DO, 2013;144 (6): 802-817) This is accomplished with one, approximately 5 second, ultra-low dose CBCT scan compared to the two longer duration exposures (pan then ceph) required with 2D imaging. Certainly a win-win for our patients.

Versatility
What else can we use the 3D data for? Digital models: used to assess the inter-arch and intra-arch relationship as well as aiding the determination of arch length and arch width requirements and assessing arch symmetry. Modelling labs can produce articulated 3D study models from the CBCT data (DICOM) files.

STL files of the patient’s dentition and occlusion can be uploaded into whatever software you may be using in your office for 3D model storage and viewing. Additionally, these models can be used (with appropriate software) to produce treatment simulations by “moving” individual teeth or the arches as a whole. Imagine completing your diagnostic records with Intra / Extra Oral photos and one 5-second CBCT scan!

Viewing the Diagnostic Data
The software that comes with a CBCT scanner can easily produce the customary 2D diagnostic images that we are used to evaluating (panoramic, lateral and A-P ceph). In addition – you see everything! The data can be viewed in sagittal, axial or coronal sections (slices) or as a 3D “volume rendering” which can be rotated and sliced (“clipped”) at will. So why is this additional information gained from CBCT imaging important?

Pathology
You will see pathology in the 3D data that isn’t visible with standard 2D imaging. When pathology is visible in 2D, the 3D data can more accurately ascertain location, extent, and character of the area of concern. This is beneficial to our patients.

Developmental Anomalies
One of my first revelations when we began imaging in 3D was the prevalence and extent of “individual anatomic variation”. But how much is too much? We have made referrals to medical specialists for significant developmental anomalies in the cervical spine, nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Patients / parents are appreciative of the thoroughness of our diagnostic process that includes 3D imaging.

Asymmetries
They get their own paragraph! Your patient smiles at you and you notice a vertical asymmetry and occlusal plane “smile” cant. Is it caused by hemimandibular hyperplasia, condylar hyperplasia, a unilateral expansive lesion in the maxilla, a growth response to unilateral progressive condylar resorption (to name a few) or a growth response to a foreign object lodged in the nasal cavity? I’ve seen them all. Similar clinical presentations – different treatment plans.

TMJ
Condylar position in centric occlusion, condylar size and shape, glenoid fossa morphology, condylar osseous morphology, joint space, findings suggestive of degenerative joint disease – both active and stable. It is hard to argue that these are not important considerations in our diagnostic process.

Airway
The value of volumetric and cross-sectional analysis of the naso – pharyngeal airway and its relationship to orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning has, and continues to be, studied in great detail. Is the growth and development of a patient who presents with narrow arches, an anterior open bite or anterior crossbite, tongue thrust and a strong mouth breathing pattern secondary to adenoid / tonsillar hyperplasia, a deviated nasal septum, environmental allergies or restrictive airway dimensions in general? Should your imaging modality include an assessment of these areas?

And there is more…
Orthognathic surgical treatment planning, TAD placement guidance, precise localization of ectopic and supernumary teeth, and assessment of treatment progress – including evaluation of root torque. All are possible or enhanced with 3D imaging. And by managing scan parameters (field of view, scan time and voxel size) at an effective dose equal to or less than 2D imaging modalities.

So, if you haven’t brought this technology into your practice – is now the time?

At the 2017 AAO Winter Conference in Ft. Lauderdale, Mr. Chris Bentson reported on a survey of recent (2016) U.S. Orthodontic Residency graduates: 88% responded that they had used CBCT imaging for diagnosis and treatment planning during their residencies including 21% that used it on all patients.

For the 2013 graduates, the responses were 76% and 9% for the same questions.

Based on these statistics, are we that far away from 3D imaging being included in the “standard of care” discussion? Embracing new technology is not easy but the value added for the practitioner and our patients is significant. The orthodontic educators who expertly taught my generation faced a similar situation during their careers with a then relatively new technology: panoramic radiographic imaging. My generation faced the challenges of transitioning from analog imaging (film) to digital.

Change is not easy. The transition from 2D to 3D imaging in your practice will require a financial and educational commitment. The whole staff will be a part of this paradigm shift. A positive – 3D imaging will be a differentiator for your practice. If you are seeking an associate, partner or complete transition, 3D imaging will make your practice more attractive to the next generation of orthodontists.

3D imaging will benefit you and your patients. Is now the time?

What Your Email Address Says About You

By Steve McEvoy, Technology Consultant

Sending business emails ending with @Netcom.com, Aol.com, Earthlink.com and soon Yahoo.com are tell-tale signs you aren’t keeping up. People notice and may ask you if you are still driving the ‘72 Ford Pinto as well.

Using personal accounts from your Internet Service Providers (ISP) also looks old school like Comcast.net, TimeWarner.com, RoadRunner.com, SBCGlobal.net.

There is no rule making us keep up, or against driving a ‘72 Pinto, but I’d argue if you are in a marketing battle for new patients, this is just one small aspect you can easily improve.

For work, you really should have an email for your practice’s domain.   DrSmith@SmithOrtho.com or DrJones@SmileDental.com, for example. People expect this, and when they see FlyingPigs65@aol.com, you send a subtle message that isn’t positive.

You might certainly have a private, personal email account as well, but even for that, you should consider using something like BobSmith@gmail.com or JaneJones@Office.com.

This should also apply to any of your staff using email on behalf of the practice.

There may be other motivating reasons as well. Companies offering email services for free (AOL and YAHOO) that aren’t thriving financially in their core business won’t be putting development resources into keeping products current, safe and secure.  The news is full of stories about hacked email accounts and ransomware which typically makes its way into your computer via email. Companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple have reputations to maintain and will have the resources to keep up.  If you are going to use a free email service, I might suggest you look to one of the major players.

Changing your primary email account is always a major hassle, and this is likely what has kept you from making the switch.  Setting up a new email account, and merely forwarding all the email from your old account indefinitely isn’t the right solution. Your old email account can still be hacked, and the company can still go out of business.

The steps generally are:

  • Setup your new email account – and take this opportunity to make sure the password is a hard one. I’d suggest you setup two-factor authentication with it as well.
  • Link your new account to your PC, phones, tablet, etc.
  • Using your old email, notify EVERYONE in your contact list that you are changing your email to the new one effective immediately.  You can do this in one mass email, but be smart about it and put all the recipients in the BCC list so they don’t see everyone else you emailed the list to. Make yourself the only official To:
  • Configure your old email account to forward to your new one (for a while).
  • After a month, check your old account to see if anyone you know is continuing to use the old account, then contact them directly to start using the new address.
  • After another month, turn off the forwarding from your old account and delete it at the vendors. Gone forever, but no risk of hacking.

You can also always enlist some help from your IT person, they should be well familiar with the process.

You have a Document Scanner in your Pocket

By Steve McEvoy, Technology Consultant

Many orthodontic practices strive to be paperless, and part of that equation is dealing with paper that comes into your practice from external sources.   Referral slips, insurance cards, drivers licenses, transfer cases, etc. Dealing with these typically involves using a scanner of various types.   In the old days, there were large ‘flat bed’ scanners.  More recently, there are highly effective ‘bread loaf’ and ‘wand’ style scanners that take up considerably less space.

What you might not realize (until now), you are probably carrying around a document scanner in your pocket.   Your smartphone, that Apple or Android phone many people carry typically has an epically good camera in it.

“Ahh, he’s going to tell us to just take pictures with the camera” might be what you’re thinking. You could, but then you have a collection of random JPEG images, probably stuck on your phone.   I’d like to direct you towards a genre of document scanning apps for your phone, ones that do more than take a picture. Microsoft Office Lens, Tiny Scanner and CamScanner are a few to mention. I use CamScanner (because someone recommended it to me) and will describe how it works in this article, but you can look at all your options as they will tend to offer the same features. You can find the CamScanner app as a feature limited free version (or splurge the $2 for the full version) in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

Scanning a Document

Once installed, CamScanner (CS) is simple to use. Open the app, click on the Camera icon, take a picture of the paper, ID card, or whatever you need to scan. The magic comes next.

The first super cool part is that CS will deskew the image.   When we take a picture, we are rarely perfectly centered above the document, rather we are probably at some weird angle and even the document we are scanning might be wrinkled or skewed.   CS automatically tries to find the edges of the document in the picture but allows you to quickly tweak its results by dragging the corners of the frames.

Once you tap the check mark icon, it will stretch the image back to its original real life square proportions (deskewing). Depending on your settings, you can also have it adjust the contrast and colors to make it more readable.  I use the default setting that converts the image to a high contrast black and white image, allowing it to make very small file sizes (which are good for saving and transmitting over the internet). You can, of course, change this to save in color.

Once you’ve scanned that item, you can continue and scan more that will be compiled into the same document at the end, page 1, 2, 3 etc. Obviously, you won’t want to scan 15-page documents this way, but a page or two is an ideal use.   This is a feature you can’t do with just taking photos with your camera, CS is building a multi-page document for you.

Getting the PDF from your Phone to your Computer

After you are done scanning, your next concern is how to get the document out of your phone and to where you want it. In a practice, you might want to be able to add it to a patient’s chart. At home (and this is GREAT for using at home) you might want to save receipts for tax purposes, scan those monthly bills or other filings.   CS gives you several methods for moving the document:

  • Cloud based storage like Dropbox and Google Drive
  • Sending the document to yourself as a PDF file attached to an email
  • Text, Bluetooth, and most any other file transfer technique your phone can muster

Sending the document as an email has been the best for me.   I can email it to myself, or to a colleague that is dealing with the patient. Maybe you send them all to Scans@YourPractice.com. When you choose this option, it prompts you for a file name for the PDF document.   You can add a subject line and a blurb of text to your email, but I usually just type in the most minimal info here “Steve McEvoy Signed Consent” or something like that, enough so you have a clue about what the document attached to the email is for.

A copy of the scanned documents is retained on the phone. You’ll need to eventually do some housekeeping to clear them off periodically, but that’s up to your style.

When you open your email, the document will be simply an attachment and you can save it to your computer or server like any other scanned PDF in your practice.

A Note about TWAIN

CS and these apps are not TWAIN compatible (an industry standard for software applications to operate scanners directly), meaning that your management software can’t directly start the scanner and import the result.   The Bread Loaf and Wand Scanners can typically do this (since they are attached to your computer), but the phone is an island so you’ll need to do the save and import steps noted above (which most Practice Management companies also support).

A Note about HIPAA

Keep in mind that if you are using these apps to scan patient records, it likely is PHI (protected health information) as defined by HIPAA.   As such, you’ll need to consider your risks and how you’ll keep that data protected.   It’s really easy to encrypt your smartphone (see this other CTech article on how), and you may want to consider using an email method that is encrypted as well.   If you are just emailing expense receipts and documents to yourself, there is no requirement for this.

So pull that phone out of your pocket, download an app, and get rid of that paper on your desk!

Creating Videos for Your Orthodontic Practice

Humans are visual creatures. Simply put, we process visual data better. Research shows that more than 80 percent of human learning is done visually and that humans process visuals 60,000 times faster than text.1  As such, creating compelling, easily sharable videos is one of the best ways you can choose to promote and showcase your orthodontic practice. Thankfully, creating low cost, high impact videos online has never been easier. With just a small amount of effort and know-how, you can make a lasting, positive impression on potential patients and set your practice apart from competition in your area.

Videos that introduce yourself and your staff, feature patient testimonials and showcase your practice and the services you offer is a key way to build trust and let potential patients get to know you before actually ever stepping foot in your office. As a bonus, videos hosted on your practice website can also improve how your site appears in search engine results…meaning increased web traffic.

Videos can easily be created without a major investment in equipment or software.  Although they do take some planning and time, especially early on, the investment is well worth the effort. But, if you are trying to keep your costs low, a newer model iPhone or Android device you may currently have in your pocket offers outstanding video capabilities. (Just be sure you’re shooting in horizontal vs. vertical mode.)

Regardless of what equipment you use, following these basics.

  • Shooting a video can be intimidating at first. Just always try to focus on sound and picture quality.
  • Shoot your video in 720p or 1080p resolution.
  • Pre-plan your video. Have a goal in mind. Create and work from an outline so you don’t go off-track.
  • Be sure to add captions to your video. This is because up to 85 percent of videos watched and shared socially are viewed without.  Captions are added via a video editor’s text feature.
  • Make the first few seconds of your video visually impactful. Your goal is to capture your viewer’s attention quickly, within the first 3 seconds.
  • Give your video a compelling title or headline.
  • Brevity is key. Be efficient with words and visuals.

As you begin planning your videos, consider:

  • Stability is key. Invest in a small tripod, monopod or desk stand – your videos will be of much higher quality if you can prevent excess camera movement.
  • If you are producing a video for patient education, you may want to invest in a high quality consumer camcorder with an external microphone.
  • While professional lighting is always preferred for marketing and practice website videos, natural lighting is usually sufficient. Just film in a brightly lit room and make sure there is enough light on your subject’s face.
  • Make sure to have your interviewee or one of their parents sign a photo/video release form giving you permission to use the video you just shot. These forms are available at aaoinfo.org. Log on; then go to Practice Management > Forms and Releases. Scroll down to Practice Management Forms & Materials; then click on Photo Releases.
  • Think outside the box. Videos can be an extremely powerful communication tool for patient education and staff training.

Once you’ve captured your video, you’ll want to begin editing. Editing video means trimming and arranging your video. Video editing software is also how you can add transitions, music, captions and titles…as well as export the movie file that you’ll host on your website or social media channel. Thankfully, there are easy-to-use and affordable options available that will allow you to quickly transform your raw footage into a finalized video for your web page or social media channels.

For users on the Mac, iMovie is a solid choice for beginners. On the Windows side, Windows Movie Maker is an ideal tool to use. Some video users even use apps on their smart phones to edit footage. Apps like the iMovie app for the iPhone and CyberLink PowerDirector for Android are well worth considering for no-frills, simple video edits. For more advanced editing, you might consider options like Apple’s Final Cut Pro X or Adobe’s Premiere Pro CC.

Creation of videos goes quickly and the learning curve is shallow. Make it a goal to begin producing videos today. Fight the urge to think it’s too difficult and just get started.

REFERENCE
1. Gutierrez, Karla. “Studies Confirm the Power of Visuals in eLearning.”

Shift eLearning (8 July 2014). Retrieved from shiftelearning.com/blog/.
* For advice or encouragement on how you can easily begin shooting videos for your practice, or for any video related questions you have, please contact Burt Bollinger, AAO Multimedia Production Manager at bbollinger@aaortho.org.

Is it Time to Say Goodbye to our DSLR Cameras?

By Dr. Anthony M. Puntillo, DDS, MSD

When I first graduated from my orthodontic residency, now more than 23 years ago, a standard set of initial records included plaster models, facial and intraoral photographs taken with film, developed, then trimmed and placed into mounts and panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs taken with film and developed in darkrooms. The digitization of our society has made the process of gathering and storing this important diagnostic information much more efficient for most orthodontists. In fact, more than four years ago (November 2012) I wrote a Tech Blog article on digital retainers and the impressionless orthodontic practice. Since then the use of intraoral scanners and 3D printing in our profession has grown exponentially. It is now not hard to imagine a day in the near future when impressions will disappear completely from the practice of dentistry.  As I near the end of my 8 year term on the CTECH committee, I can’t help but wonder what is next.   Where else can we use technology to eliminate inefficient processes from our practices?

The most obvious next step for me is the elimination of intraoral photographs. All of those intraoral scanners, now used by most orthodontists, take multiple photographs of our patients’ teeth to create the 3D digital images. Several of these scanners can capture images in true, or close to true color. It can’t be long before we come to the realization that digital images taken with a good intraoral scanner are a better alternative to the standard set of 5-7 intraoral 2D photos we have been taking for decades. The 3D digital image is not only a better diagnostic record of the patient’s current dental state, it also is more versatile in that it can also be used to create and fabricate appliances (i.e. clear aligners, indirect bonding setups, retainers, etc.). If a good intraoral scan can consistently be completed in less than 10 minutes, aren’t we wasting our time and that of our patients’ taking 2D photos. I concede that we are all very accustomed to diagnosing our patients with these 2D photographic images. However, it was not that long ago when most thought that multiple radiographic exposures were necessary on the majority of our patients.   Now most of our patients are diagnosed with a single, quick radiograph taken on a CBCT machine and from that single exposure we derive a much higher level of diagnostic information.

To be honest, I am not yet ready to mothball our cameras. For starters, I still think that facial 2D photos are necessary. I know that there are 3D cameras available that will someday eliminate the need for our extraoral series of facial photos. However, for whatever reason (I believe primarily cost) these have not yet caught on. So for now we will still be taking a series of three 2D digital photos of our patients’ faces. Additionally, 2D intraoral pictures still play a significant role in our new patient consultations. We have not yet found the best way to display and share the captured 3D dental images (STL files) to educate our patients. I anticipate that this last hurdle will be overcome in 2017 and when that happens our DSLRs are going to see much less action and our IOSs are going to play an even larger role in our new patient process.